Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 9th International Congress on Nutrition & Health Berlin, Germany.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Ze’ev Katzir

Tel Aviv University, Israel

Keynote: Dietary therapy for children with congenital solitary functioning kidney

Time : 10:00-10:40

OMICS International  Nutrition & Health 2017  International Conference Keynote Speaker Ze’ev Katzir photo
Biography:

Ze'ev Katzir, Tel Aviv University, Israel.

Abstract:

Background: Renal injury, proteinuria and hypertension, are consequences of congenital solitary functioning kidney (CSFK). Renal injury appears around 10 years of age and required dialysis by the age of 30 years. Low protein intake attenuated renal damage in animal experimental models, uninephrectomized patients and kidney transplant donors and recipients. Low salt intake facilitates blood pressure control.

Objective: Relevant data concerning CSFK patients had not been described so far. We decided to examine long preventing effect of protein restriction and low-salt diet on proteinuria, kidney function and hypertension, in this distinct population.

Methods: Twenty eight children with CSFK were included in a prospective observational exposure serie. Following parents' agreement, protein and salt restriction: 0.85x recommended daily allowance (RDA) was started under dietitian supervision. Compliance verification was performed by: Monitoring urinary urea nitrogen and body weight; and measuring 24 hour urine sodium. Follow-up (8-22 years and mean 15.8 years) included clinical, growth and developmental assessment, renal function and urine protein excretion.

Results: Baseline data showed normal physical assessment, arterial blood pressure kidney functions and urinalysis. There was one patient with ipsilateral kidney malformation and two with systemic pathologies. Adherence to dietary restrictions: 89 ±8% for protein and 93±5% salt. At the end of follow up: two patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD) grade I. None had hypertension, proteinuria or growth and development deterioration.

Conclusion: Strict follow-up and controlled dietary supervision for mild protein and salt restriction prevent kidney injury proteinuria and hypertension in CSFK, without insults on growth and development.

  • Pediatric Nutrition and Child Care | Plant nutrition and Nutraceuticals | Balanced Nutrition and Dietary Assessment Studies | Advanced Knowledge and Current research in Nutrition
Location: Sylt 4-5
Speaker

Chair

Zeev Katzir

Tel Aviv University, Israel

Session Introduction

Roni Lara Moya

CESPU University, Portugal

Title: Detox and metabolism practical orthomolecular and nutritional approach

Time : 10:40-11:10

Speaker
Biography:

 Roni Lara Moya has done his studies in Biomedicine from the University of Mogi das Cruzes, Sao Paulo. He has done his specialization in Anti-Aging Medicine from Seville University, Spain. He completed his Master of Science in Molecular and Cellular Immunology and Biology from the University of Coimbra, Portugal and Master of Science in Clinical Advanced Nutrition from the University of Barcelona, Spain. He did his PhD in Biomedicine and Immunology from the Gulbenkian Institute of Science and Coimbra University.  He is the Coordinator of Orthomolecular Medicine of ReGenera Research Group for Aging Intervention. He is the Professor and Director of the Graduation Program in Orthomolecular Therapy - CESPU University, Portugal. He is the Scientific Advisor for Nutraceuticals and Cell Therapy Companies in Europe. 

Abstract:

One of the main health problems of the contemporary life and a mandatory concern to all anti-aging physicians is the outcome of the constant contact with the high level of intoxication, which can be connected to the widest range of diseases, from allergies till cancer or neurodegeneration. Discussion of the physiological pathways for detoxification has been mainly centered around phase I and phase II enzyme systems. Some key nutrients and antioxidants substances, which can inhibit the oxidation of a molecule and have the capacity to nullify the ill effects of oxidation caused by free radicals in the living organisms, continuously investigated for their role in the modulation of metabolic pathways involved in detoxification processes. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase are the key enzymatic antioxidants of this defense system by which the free radicals that are produced during metabolic reactions are removed. Several publications to date have leveraged cell, animal, and clinical studies to demonstrate that within the correct dose and synergy, food-derived components and nutrients can function as important co-factors to modulate processes of conversion and excretion of toxins from the body. The “Phase I” cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes (CYP450) is generally the first defense employed by the body to bio transform xenobiotics, steroid hormones, and pharmaceuticals. These microsomal membrane-bound, heme-thiolate proteins, located mainly in the liver, but also in enterocytes, kidneys, lung, and even the brain, are responsible for the oxidation, peroxidation, and reduction of several endogenous and exogenous substrates. It is accepted that any variability in the number of CYP450 enzymes could have benefit(s) and/or consequence(s) for how some individual responds to the effect(s) of (a) toxin(s). Many nutrients appear to act as both inducers and inhibitors of CYP1 enzyme. These findings indicate that specific foods, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, etc., may upregulate or favorably balance metabolic pathways to assist with toxin biotransformation and subsequent elimination. Various foods such as cruciferous vegetables, berries, soy, garlic, turmeric and other spices, plus probiotics and exogenous antioxidants such as vitamins C, E, B complex, glutathione, cysteine, taurine, methionine, L-carnitine, CoQ10, etc., have been suggested to be beneficial and commonly prescribed as part of the orthomolecular and functional medicine-based therapies. The objective of this talk is to highlight the clinical effect of the orthomolecular nutrients in the detoxification mechanisms. Enhance the knowledge about the main antioxidants, foods, and their individual phytonutrients, especially in the case of dietary supplements and functional foods, could be worthwhile for clinicians to consider for patients who are taking a polypharmacy approach or are in contact with pollution by-products, heavy metals, hormones and further xenobiotics.

Break: Coffee Break 11:10-11:25 @ Sylt Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Abdullah Erdil, Ordu University, Turkey

Abstract:

Aim: Determination of general socio-demographic and disease symptoms of children who applied to polyclinic with complaints of loss of appetite in the study and to show growth-development performance.

Material & Methods: All subjects (n=198) who did not have acute infection and gastrointestinal system disease, had at least one-month loss of appetite and volunteered to participate in the study between 01.02.2015-01.08.2015 were included in the study. Relative weighing values of patients according to age were recorded in kilograms per centile. Three categorizations were made according to the 3-day diet list requested by the children's anorexia-status family and the evaluation of the questionnaire forms (true appetite=insufficient calorie intake, normal=adequate balanced calorie intake, selective appetite=adequate-calorie intake, unbalanced diet). At the end of the study, it was determined by Chi-square analysis whether the other characteristics of the children changed according to the loss of appetite.

Results: It was determined that the loss of appetite in the study did not show a statistically significant change according to sex (p=0.085) but the selective anorexia rate (43%) was higher in girls than in boys (29.4%). Significant differences were found between the level of income in the study (P=0.003), maternal working status (P=0.040), serum 25OH-Ditamin levels (P<0.001), Percentile (P<0.001) and Relative weighing (P<0.001). As a result of the study, children with lower income levels and those with non-working mothers found a higher rate of loss of appetite. In addition, body weight percentile and relative weighing values ​​by age were lower in children without real appetite. Again, patients with serum 25OH-Dvitamin levels <15 mg/dL had a higher rate of loss of appetite. It has been found that there is no significant effect of factors such as family structure, lack of appetite in family and who is fed by the individual (P>0.05).

Conclusion: In childhood, the proportion of normal children who apply for a doctor due to loss of appetite and eating problems varies between 20-35%. In this sense, the patients with close to the lower limit of the normal percentage and relative weight loss with respect to growth retardation, an important result of loss of appetite, should be followed closely. In addition, suggestions should be made in terms of balanced nutrition and nutritional behavior of patients with selective appetite.

Speaker
Biography:

Zorka Stanic is working as an Associate Professor of Faculty of Science and has gained her experience in both research and teaching. She has been investigating Fundamental and Applicable Chemistry, particularly focusing on sensors/biosensors and compounds of a great importance for human. In recent years, she has built a special interest towards food additive/nutrition with an active biological/drug function and, hence, she is widely open to investigating naturally occurring polyphenols, much further. These scientific studies include evaluation and application of safe, beneficial and highly multi-functional compounds from natural source in nutrition and therapy. 

Abstract:

Turmeric plant, Curcuma longa, a popular, thousands of years used Indian spice for the human nutrition for centuries used in herbal medicines for the treatment of a variety diseases, is constantly in the focus of the world scientific community. Gladly consumed in a daily dosage of approximately 3 g/70 kg, this spice is used as a food but serves as a safe, natural medicament, without any perceived adverse, side effects in clinical trials. Thanks to the aforesaid, curcumin, as a main ingredient of turmeric, is the subject of intensive examination of various, mutually intertwined scientific fields – nutrition, food chemistry, medicine, and pharmacy. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anti-proliferative, anti-carcinogenic, anti-amyloidogenic, antiviral, anti-HIV effects are just some of the many biological activities which this vital compound possesses (Fig. 1). The structure of curcumin and its ability to overcome multidrug resistance of different cancer cells represents a main base for its implementation as a therapeutic agent. However, a weakness of this, justified-popular compound, consists of its low water solubility and stability, rapid metabolism and thereby poor absorption/bioavailability. Exactly the stated “weaknesses” of curcumin are the main guidelines for further researches. Nanoparticle-based carriers, different forms of curcumin encapsulation in different micelles, and improving drug delivery systems are some of today’s existing solutions for overcoming the specified drawbacks of curcumin. The significance of the quality of a substance delivery system is reflected in the fact that carrying curcumin as a food additive/nutrition also means carrying the active biological product/drug. Implementation of a safe and functional compounds from natural sources in therapy, carried out some modifications in order to achieve their multi-functionality, improve their bioavailability and delivery strategies, and reduce the potentially-negative side effects, with the main aim to enhance their effectiveness; these are the prime guidelines for the future scientific research teams, all over the world.

Figure: Multiple biological activities of curcumin

Carla Vartanian

American Overseas Dietetic Association, Lebanon

Title: Nutritional management for the prevention of the diabesity epidemic

Time : 12:25-12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Carla Vartanian is a consultant in clinical nutrition dietetics and metabolism and certified in Clinical Bioethics from Harvard Medical School. She has the European ESPEN teaching diploma of the European Society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism in which she is actively involved by conducting nutrition support workshops for dietitians and physicians. Throughout her career, her areas of interest focused on nutrition research and education as she has been speaking in many international scientific meetings, teaching nutrition in different universities in Beirut and publishing nutrition and health articles in the Middle East. In addition she has her own weekly nutrition and health awareness TV show in Lebanon since 2008. She is an active member of many nutrition and dietetic associations around the world. Her latest international recognitions include the award of teaching excellence and the successful member of the year recognition by the World Public Health Nutrition Association.

Abstract:

Diabesity is defined as a metabolic dysfunction that ranges from mild blood sugar imbalance to full-fledged type 2 diabetes, which can be preventable and in some cases entirely reversible. It affects more than one billion people worldwide, including 100 million Americans and 50% of Americans over 65. Recent statistics suggest that diabesity may already be the leading cause of chronic disease and death in the world, and its impact is expected to rise dramatically in the next 25 years with a major impact on the healthcare systems worldwide.

Diabesity is a constellation of signs that includes abdominal obesity dyslipidemia, high blood pressure, high blood systemic inflammation and, a tendency to form blood clots. The “diabese” patients have increased risk of heart disease, stroke, dementia, cancer, kidney failure and blindness among many other conditions.

To date, there are no national recommendations from governments or worldwide diabetes organizations to advise screening and treatment of this epidemic, thus many people suffering from diabesity may be left undiagnosed and untreated.

The entire spectrum of diabesity including all of its complications is simply downstream symptoms that result from unhealthy eating habits, sedentary lifestyle, and environmental factors.

Interventions with a clinical nutritionist and medical doctor and some basic lifestyle changes can help patients lose weight, regulate blood sugar, reverse the effects of diabesity and help pave the way for better long-term health.

Aside from healthy eating recommendation, exercise remains the single best medication for diabesity

Break: Lunch Break & Poster Session 12:55-14:20 @ Restaurant Rienacker
Speaker
Biography:

Aryaeian Naheed has her expertise is in Nutrition and Immunology. She is a Faculty Member in Nutrition Department at the Iran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Her topics of interest are Functional Foods, Nutriceuticals and Nutrition Immunity. 

Abstract:

Background & Objective: Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic, chronic disease which may increase the risk of osteoporosis. This study was carried out in order to examine the effect of conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) on bone markers in rheumatoid arthritis disease which is the most common autoimmune disease.

Materials & Methods: The present study is a randomized double-blind clinical trial. Subjects included 46 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis who were divided into two groups. Group I received standard treatment plus 2 daily 1.25 gram capsules (containing about 2 grams of 9-cis 11-tans isomer and 10-cis 12-tans isomer in ratio of 50-50 CLAs in glycerinated form), Group II received standard treatment plus 2 placebo 1.25 gram capsules containing sunflower oil with high oleic acid. Telopeptide C, osteocalcin, MMP3 were analyzed by ELISA method, PGE2 was done by competitive enzymatic immunoassay method, IGF-1 was analyzed by IRMA method based on the sandwich method and ALK-P of bone. Before and after intervention the questionnaires about general information and medical history were filled. Nutrition assessment with 24-hour record questionnaire about three day’s diet was done. The results were analyzed using SPSS version 18 software.

Findings: There was no significant difference between the groups in enzyme activity of ALK-P of bone, PGE2 and MMP3 variable. However, significant differences between the groups in terms of activity of telopeptide C, osteocalcin and IGF1 were significant (P<0.05).

Conclusion: There is a potential benefit effect of CLAs on bone markers in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, in order to study the effect of CLAs on decrease bone density reduction in patients with RA as well as all patients with autoimmune and bone diseases, more studies are required with longer duration along with the evaluation of bone density. 

Speaker
Biography:

 Professor Ignatius Onimawo has done PhD in Human Nutrition from University of Ibadan. At present he is the current Vice-Chancellor of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo State Nigeria. Formerly Dean of College of Food Processing and Storage Technology and Foundation Head of Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike. Formerly the Editor-in-Chief of the Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences and formerly the Director of Academic Planning and Head of Biochemistry, Ambrose Alli University Ekpoma, Nigeria. 

Abstract:

Proximate and mineral compositions of three selected traditional spices (Zingiber officinale, Allium sativum, and Monodora myristica) were evaluated in this study. Disease-free samples of garlic, ginger and African nutmeg were bought from a local market at Ekpoma in Southern Nigeria. The samples were peeled and were grinded to a desirable texture. Wet samples were analyzed for the proximate composition and mineral contents. From the results, moisture, ash, crude protein, fat, fiber and carbohydrate content of ginger were 72.20, 0.81, 8.91, 11.71, 1.38, and 2.01%, respectively; that of garlic were 59.90, 0.94, 12.41, 6.13, 1.95, 18.53%, respectively, while African nutmeg had 8.14, 1.39, 13.57, 46.48, 27.39, and 3.06%, respectively. It was also found that sodium, zinc, iron, and calcium were 7.32, 4.99, 9.68, and 182.67mg/100g, respectively in ginger, 9.41, 1.89, 8.47, 1016 mg/100 g in garlic. In African nutmeg, it was found to be 110.20, 135.91, 147.28, and 166.10mg/100g, respectively. Consequently, ginger, garlic and African nutmeg possessed varying proportions of the proximate components as well as mineral elements. However, African nutmeg possessed better moisture, ash, crude protein, crude fat and crude fiber contents with high sodium, zinc and iron mineral contents compared to other spices examined while garlic had a better carbohydrate and calcium levels.

Speaker
Biography:

Abdulkarim Dakah is a Doctor at Damascus University, he has done his Doctorate in Plant Biology, worked at the International University for Sciences and Technology, Kalamoon University and Damascus University. He has a lot of Laboratory skills, like: test of bioactivity of plants, plant tissue culture and molecular characterization. He has published many articles in international journals. He has done his work on Bio-pesticidal Proteins: from isolation to molecular characterization and applications and has been certified by the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria in cooperation with International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB). He has reviewed a lot of manuscripts for international journals.

Abstract:

Medicinal plants played an important role in the treatment of diseases and health disorders for thousands of years and are still import

ant in traditional medicine systems around the world. Ziziphora tenuior L. (Lamiaceae) is an aromatic herb used for its medicinal values against fungi, bacteria. Z. tenuior has been used to treat fever, dysentery, diarrhea, gut inflammation, cough, bladder stones, and painful menstruation. For increased human needs of medicines, plant tissue culture is used widely for micro-propagation of medicinal plants to produce enough amounts of drugs and secondary metabolites, using this technology, the natural products can be provided at any time of the year without waiting for the suitable season to collect the plant. This work aims to develop a reliable protocol for the in vitro propagation of Z. tenuior, and increase active substances to compare the antioxidant activity between in vitro propagated and wild plants. The explants were sterilized and cultured on MS medium containing different concentrations of growth regulators naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) or indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) with 0.5 mg/L of kinetin (Kin) callus formation was 70.2% after 45 days of incubation in dark on medium supplemented with 1.5 mg/L of NAA. After one month of callus culture on medium supplemented with 2 mg/L BA the shoot number was 5.12 and for the multiplication stage. The shoot number was 4.21 and length was 6.17 cm on medium supplemented with 1 mg/L Kin +0.1 mg/L NAA. DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) reagent was used to test the antioxidant activity. The aqueous and methanol extracts of in vitro plants which were treated with 1.5 and 1 mg/L of kin plus 0.1 mg/L of NAA showed a strong DPPH scavenging activity where IC50 was 0.307 and 0.369 mg/ml, respectively, while the IC50 of aqueous and methanol extracts of wild plants was 0.516 and 9.229 mg/ml, respectively. 

 

Ignatius Onimawo

Ambrose Alli University, Nigeria

Title: Physicochemical properties of the pulp of African star apple

Time : 15:50-16:20

Speaker
Biography:

Professor Ignatius Onimawo has done PhD in Human Nutrition from University of Ibadan. At present he is the current Vice-Chancellor of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo State Nigeria. Formerly Dean of College of Food Processing and Storage Technology and Foundation Head of Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike. Formerly the Editor-in-Chief of the Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences and formerly the Director of Academic Planning and Head of Biochemistry, Ambrose Alli University Ekpoma, Nigeria.

Abstract:

Healthy samples of African star apple fruit Chrysophyllum albidum Lin. were purchased from a local market of Ekpoma, Southern Nigeria during the month of April. Standard biochemical protocols were adopted in the evaluation of the physicochemical properties of the pulp. From the results, ash, moisture, protein, fat, fiber and carbohydrate content were found to be 0.41, 85.38, 0.76, 4.32, 0.57 and 8.46%, respectively. It was also observed that the pulp contained 10.19 mg/100 g of calcium, 2.90 mg/100 iron, 102.85 mg/100 g sodium, 40.26 mg/100 g magnesium and 346.17 mg/100 g potassium. Polyphenolics such as tannin, total phenol, alkaloid and flavonoid were found to be 8.31 mg/100 g, 5.57 mg/100 g, 26.79 mg/100 g, and 16.10 mg/100 g, respectively while anti-nutrients such as phytate, oxalate, and saponins were found to be 0.08 g/100 g, 1.25 g/100 g, and 9.38 g/100 g, respectively. The pH, titratable acid, total dissolved solids, total solids, conductivity, sugar and energy content were found to be 2.42, 0.08%, 7.62 g/100 g, 23.33 g/100 g, 232.67Nhoms/an, 18.27 g/100 g, and 206.18 MJ/100 g, respectively. The pulp was found to be very rich in vitamin A (246.33 mg/100 g) while the vitamin C content was 40.06 mg/100g. African star apple is therefore a very nutritious fruit.

Break: Coffee Break 16:20-16:35 @ Sylt Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Lyubov L Kuchkarova has explored the impact of different exogenous (hormones, xenobiotics, immobilization, malnutrition, overheating, etc.) and endogenous (hormones) factors on the formation of hydrolytic and transport systems of the digestive system of a growing organism for 30 years. Currently, she is engaged in search of eсologically acceptable biologically active compounds to correct shifts caused by various Xenobiotics in gastrointestinal tract. In addition, she is the Head of the Health Club at the National University of Uzbekistan, where special attention is paid to healthy nutrition. She is also the author of number of textbooks and manuals on the Physiology of Digestion and Nutrition for students.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: It is known that increasing of heavy metal pollution is correlated with increasing of gastrointestinal diseases. This suggests the need to find ways to mass prevention and/or correction of digestive disorders at heavy metal intoxication, especially in industrial regions. The purpose of current study is testing some of the biological substrates to correct heavy metal caused digestive disorders.

Methods: Morphological and functional characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract have been obtained during multiple experiments with administration of biologically active substances to intoxicated with heavy metal laboratory animals.

Findings: Аcute toxicity of cadmium, lead and/or mercury ions results in adaptive shifts in the pancreatic and intestinal enzyme activity to preserve energy homeostasis. Chronic intoxication with heavy metals leads to the development of pancreatitis, diabetes, malabsorption and other digestive disorders. For the prevention and/or correction of heavy metal intoxication among the tested biological substrates (flavonoids, terpenoids and non-starch polysaccharides) the most effective were non-starch polysaccharides (chitosan, inulin and pectin).

Conclusion: These data suggest that adding non-starch polysaccharides in the diet may promotes the correction of pathological changes in the gastrointestinal tract in heavy metal-contaminated areas.

Marjan Bazhan

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Title: Functional foods against metabolic syndrome: How to promote their consumption in the community?

Time : 17:05-17:35

Speaker
Biography:

Marjan Bazhan has expertise in the field of Community Nutrition, Behavior Change, and Health Promotion. Her last research work was to assess the determinants of functional dairy products consumption among adults in the city of Tehran: A study based on social marketing theory. This is the first study in Iran that aimed to determine consumption status of these products, as well as identify facilitators and inhibitors affecting them for designing effective interventions to promote sustainable consumption of these products.

Abstract:

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterized by central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, high fasting glucose, chronic low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress. Changes in lifestyle including healthy dietary regimens and increased physical activity should be the first lines of therapy to decrease MetS. According to previous studies, functional foods help prevent or reduce metabolic syndrome by assisting the body homeostasis mechanisms. However, the development of functional foods requires consumers’ awareness, positive attitude towards these products, and their acceptance by consumers. Given the importance of functional foods consumption and their acceptance by consumers, as well as the lack of information in this field in Iran, this study aimed to identify strategies based on social marketing approach to promote consumption of functional dairy products in Tehran, the capital of Iran. Qualitative data was collected via focus group discussions and individual interviews. For this purpose, 8 focus group discussions with housewives and employed women, and 40 in-depth interviews with key stakeholders (in different fields of production, distribution and consumption) was held, between May and September 2014. In total, 105 people participated in this qualitative research. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze the data, using MAXQDA® software. Using content analysis, strategies to promote consumption of functional dairy products from the perspective of key stakeholders and consumers were categorized in 5 main groups: (i) factors related to consumer, which included four subthemes - knowledge, attitude, personal taste and preferences, and nutritional priorities; (ii) product characteristics, which included two subthemes- sensory and non-sensory characteristics; (iii) product accessibility included two subthemes- physical and economic accessibility; (iv) place of the product supply; and (v) promotion strategies, which included four subthemes- informing and educating, advertising, recommending friends, professionals and others, and supporting the production. This information can be useful for different stakeholders including food industry to help them develop appropriate marketing plan for each groups of consumers to meet their specific needs and preferences, both health policy makers to understand the marketing aspect of the people’s changing consumption behavior to design effective interventions to increase consumption of these products among consumers.